REPORT ON WORKING CLASS FAMILY INCOME & EXPENDITURE

SURVEY, 1999-2000 , Base is 2001=100

CENTRE: MUMBAI

Main Findings

The important findings of the survey conducted at Mumbai (including Thane) centre are given below:

  1. The total number of working class families covered during the survey was 1512.
  2. The estimated total number of working class families as defined for the purpose of the survey was about 14.43 lakhs.
  3. The estimated total number of employees in these families was about 20.16 lakhs.
  4. The average monthly income per employee from paid employment worked out to Rs. 4922.72.
  5. Spinning, weaving and finishing of textiles industry dominated in terms of employment.
  6. About 75 per cent of the total employees were employed on a regular basis, 18 per cent were on casual basis and the remaining 7 per cent on contractual basis.
  7. The average size of a working class family worked out to be 4.71 persons of which 1.14 were earners, 0.35 earning dependants and 3.22 non-earning dependants consisting of 1.93 men, 1.58 women and 1.20 children.
  8. The modal family size was with four and five members.
  9. The estimated total number of family members was 67.94 lakhs. Out of which, 54.29 per cent were males. Of the total family members, 45.53 per cent were married, 4.53 per cent were widowed, divorced or separated and the remaining 49.94 per cent were un-married.
  10. The dependency ratio was 401/1000.
  11. Around 11 percent of the family members (5 years of age and above) were illiterate and more than 3 per cent were graduate and above.
  12. Around 32 per cent of the family members (5 years of age and above) were employees and about 61 per cent were not in labour force.
  13. Of all the families, 87.34 per cent of the families had one earner, 11.28 per cent had two earners while the remaining 1.38 per cent had three or more earners.
  14. The average monthly income per family worked out to be Rs. 7594.84 and the per capita income as Rs. 1610.59.
  15. As much as 90.57 per cent of the total average monthly income came from paid employment.
  16. Within the paid employment, basic wages and allowances contributed more than 93 per cent of the total income.
  17. The average expenditure per family worked out to be Rs. 5514.09. Out of which, Rs. 5014.70 was on consumption expenditure and Rs. 499.39 was on non-consumption expenditure.
  18. Within consumption expenditure, the share of food items was 50.24 per cent.
  19. Around 79 per cent of the families had spent less than 45 percent of their total expenditure on food.
  20. About 99 per cent of the families reported expenditure on savings and investments.
  21. There was a significant decline in the percentage of families reporting expenditure on pan, supari, tobacco & tobacco products and alcoholic beverages as compared to 1981-82 survey.
  22. The percentage of families reporting expenditure on medical care, personal care, education & reading and transport & communication during 1999-2000 increased substantially as compared to 1981-82 survey with the maximum jump on education and reading.
  23. The average monthly quantity of Cereals and Cereal Products consumed per family worked out to be 45.85 Kgs, of which major share was accounted for by wheat (21.01 Kgs) and rice (20.85 Kgs). The per capita consumption of Cereals and Cereal Products was 9.73 Kgs.
  24. The average monthly consumption of milk per family has more than doubled to 22.28 litres from 10.84 litres in 1981-82 survey.
  25. About 89 per cent of families recorded an average surplus income of Rs. 2080.75 over family expenditure.
  26. The incidence of indebtedness worked out to be 33.23 per cent during 1999-2000 as compared to 52.04 per cent in 1981-82 survey.
  27. Maximum proportion of families (i.e. 28.72 per cent) was in the loan amount class of Rs. 10000 to less than Rs. 20000.
  28. The average amount of outstanding debt per indebted family worked out to be Rs. 21781.03.
  29. Co-operative credit societies were the main source of loans.
  30. Despite a sharp increase in the interest rates charged by moneylenders the proportion of families availing loans from them rose upto 5.02 per cent as compared to 2.92 per cent in 1981-82 survey
  31. About 66 per cent of the families were residing in chawl- bustees; around 32 per cent were using flats as their residence and less than one per cent had independent houses.
  32. Of all the families, 79.76 per cent had made their own arrangements for accommodation, 18.03 per cent were provided dwellings by the employers and the remaining 2.21 per cent were residing in the dwellings provided by friends and relatives etc.
  33. The percentage of families enjoying basic amenities like kitchen, bathroom, latrine and electricity was 31.46 per cent, 32.82 per cent, 97.28 per cent and 97.62 per cent respectively.

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 NOTE :     Detailed  report is available with Controller of Publications, Civil Line, New Delhi.